Monday, April 1, 2013

Sashiko Needles, Fabric, Threads...


My first title for this post was "Projects Finished Zero" as that is what I have accomplished lately.  My creative muse has been languishing in laziness.  However...
When I made my Hari-Kuro Needlebook from Susan's e-course there was a needle label for Sashiko.
You can visit Susan at her blog Plays With Needles.  I had no idea what type of needles these were so Susan was kind enough to explain...

Sashiko

Sashiko needles are similar to long darners...they are very long, at least 2 inches, and are used for long, straight running stitches. The shaft of the sashiko needle is larger than that of the same size darner and will not bend or break when loaded with stitched fabric. The strength of the needle allows for stitching in a straight line.



Fortunately Susan also included resources to obtain such a needle.  Because I had never tried this Sashiko and the fact that I am truly and hopelessly unfocused I decided I just had to obtain such supplies and try them.  Oh yeah, Mr. C was not surprised as this is my pattern in life.
In the photo above you can see my new fabric, threads and my needle book with a Sashiko needle on the labeled page.  Now I am happy because I didn't want any blank pages in my little book.


I have yet to begin my try at Sashiko but at least I am prepared with the proper tools.  I purchased the long and longer needles so I could see which one works best for my style of sewing this fabric.  I will post an update when I have something to show after needle and thread have married and gone stitching on Indigo fabric honeymoon.
Thank you Susan for introducing this amazing technique of Sashiko.
Rain and Winter are here once again.  I am thankful for the rain.
May all your creative projects make you smile with joy...

20 comments:

  1. I cannot wait to see what comes from this, I have never heard of this before,

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  2. Interesting, I did not know Sashiko work had it's own needles but it makes sense when you think about it. When you stitch those curvy lines like in the fabric example do you still load up a long needle or are the long needles mostly for straight lines?
    Deb

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  3. Sherry, happy playing with your new tools and that tecnique ,that I know nothing about, how wonderful that Sashiko has it own needles, that would speak to my creating soul aswell.
    Hugs,Dorthe

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  4. I really like the look of sashiko. Good luck!

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  5. Oh I can't wait to see what you do with your fancy new needles! You have us on the edge of our chairs!

    Carol

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  6. Sashiko is another wonderful, relaxing technique! You'll love it!!!

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  7. lol - that's my modus operandi as well, see it, get the necessities, find them a comfortable place on the shelf until someday I get around to trying them out!
    I love your little needle book Sherry, and I am so glad for you, that you haven't any blank pages in it!

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  8. Hello Sherry,
    This new project looks fascinating! I have never heard of it. So I am really interested in how you go about it. I look forward to your next post about it.
    Hugs,
    Terri

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  9. This is really cool...but I know what you mean, my muse is still hibernating. Love seeing your little needle book.. Sometimes obtaining and organizing your tools can be a fun project in and of itself!

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  10. as they say never too old to learn something new, the needle are new to me, also heard about extra long ones for quilting the other day, wonder if they are the same ones. Happy Sashiko quilting.

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  11. I also have never heard of this before and will eagerly await what is created. thanks for sharing them! :)

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  12. I had fun earlier this year making a Sashiko needlebook for a StitchMAP challenge. I quite enjoyed it as the stitching was meditative, and created a pretty pattern. I'm sure you'll enjoy Sashiko, Sherry, and I look forward to seeing your results. I didn't know there was a special Sashiko needle either. Happy stitching!

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  13. Hello and Happy Spring! I've been awa from Blogland for a while so it's been so nice to spend some time and get caught up on my favorite blogs. Love seeing what you've been up to! Your photos of the vineyards are so beautiful! Hope you're enjoying April!
    Take care,
    Holly

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  14. Will look forward to seeing your venture into Sashiko!

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  15. Never tried Sashiko needles myself. Look forward to hearing your verdict on them. Hugs Mrs a.

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  16. Hi Sherry, great tools make all the difference, don't they? With your talents there is no end to what you will accomplish next. Love reading about these needles as I had not heard of them either.
    Wishing you lots of fun and happy creating!!
    Hugs, CM

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  17. Wow Sherry I didn't know there were those special Sashiko needles -
    that would certainly make those lovely running stitches much easier.
    Love your darling little needle book you have created also.
    Happy crafting!
    Suzy

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  18. I have never heard of this; it looks and sounds to be really amazing! Thanks for enlightening me on this. I will look forward to viewing your projects. Love your needle book, too! xxoo

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  19. Oh my, I have missed so many of your posts! I am so sorry!
    Your needle book is absolutely adorable, you Easter table looks lovely and those buckets you made are too sweet!!
    I'm happy that you are happy with your new needle and I can't wait to see what you make with it!!
    xxD

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  20. There are so many different needles for so many different things. Who knew! Enjoy the process of learning something new. Tammy

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